12 January - 20 June 2016

Vitamin D and food allergies

6 March 13

Consumption of high doses of vitamin D supplements during pregnancy may raise the risk of children developing food allergies after birth, says research.  Vitamin D is known to help strengthen bones, protect against infections during the winter, and aid the nervous and muscular systems.  However, some studies have questioned the positive aspects of the vitamin.  During the latest study published in the journal Allergy, researchers looked at the association between vitamin D levels during pregnancy and at birth, the immune status and allergic diseases of the children later in life.  They included 622 mothers and their 629 children from the German LINA cohort, all of whom had been tested for their vitamin D levels during pregnancy and also in the cord blood of the children born.  In addition to this, questionnaires were used to assess the occurrence of food allergies during the first two years of the children’s lives.  The result was clear:  in cases where expectant mothers were found to have a low vitamin D level in the blood, the occurrence of food allergies among their two-year old children was rarer than in cases where expectant mothers had a high vitamin D level.  In reverse, this means that a high vitamin D level in pregnant women is associated with a higher risk of their children developing a food allergy during infancy.  Furthermore, those children were found to have a high level of the specific immunoglobulin E to food allergens such as egg white, milk protein, wheat flour, peanuts or soya beans.  According to the researchers, even though the occurrence of food allergies is undoubtedly affected by many other factors than just the vitamin D level, it is still important to take this aspect into consideration.

RSSL's Functional Ingredients Laboratory provides vitamin analysis in a wide range of matrices including drinks, fortified foods, pre-mixes and multi-vitamin tablets, including the analysis for Vitamin D2 and Vitamin D3.  It provides a full vitamin and mineral analysis service to assist with labelling, due diligence, claim substantiation and stability. For more information please contact Customer Services on Freephone 0800 243482 or email enquiries@rssl.com

RSSL carries out allergen testing using immunological, DNA and distillation techniques, depending on the allergen to be detected. Detection limits are in the range 1- 100 mg allergen/kg of sample for almond, Brazil nut, macadamia nut, peanut, walnut, hazelnut, cashew nut, pistachio nut, pecan nut, pine nut and chestnut.  Celery, celeriac, black mustard, lupin  and kiwi allergens can be detected by DNA methods, as can crustacean, fish and mollusc allergens.  The laboratory also uses a range of UKAS accredited immunological procedures for the detection of allergens including gluten, peanut, hazelnut, almonds, soya, egg, milk, sesame and histamine.  Distillation and titration methods are used for the determination of sulphur dioxide and sulphites.  For more information please contact Customer Services on Freephone 0800 243482 or email enquiries@rssl.com.

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