12 January - 20 June 2016

Sesame consumption can significantly reduce blood triacylglycerol (TAG) levels

Researchers at the Griffith University in Austria have used meta-analysis of controlled trials to review the effects of sesame consumption on blood lipid profile. Sesame has often been related to its plasma lipid-lowering properties brought about by the considerable amounts of vitamin C, MUFA, fibre and lignans that it holds.

Researchers at the Griffith University in Austria have used meta-analysis of controlled trials to review the effects of sesame consumption on blood lipid profile. Sesame has often been related to its plasma lipid-lowering properties brought about by the considerable amounts of vitamin C, MUFA, fibre and lignans that it holds.

The researchers analysed 10 controlled trials which were based on the eligibility criteria to summarise the available evidence. The Cochrane Collaboration tool and Rosendale scale was used to assess the risk of bias.

The results showed that the consumption of sesame did not show any significant change to the concentrations of total blood cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol or HDL-cholesterol. However, there was a significant reduction in serum TAG level after consuming sesame oil. The authors suggest further research to investigate sesame consumption as a complimentary dietary constituent to understand its potential effects in improving lipid profiles to reduce the risk of CVD.

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