12 January - 20 June 2016

“We all need to eat more fruit, veg, fibre and oily fish and cut back on sugar” – PHE

According to the latest National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS) by Public Health England, children aged 4 to 10 years are consuming more than double the recommended amount of sugar although consumption of sugary drinks has fallen compared to 6 years ago. The NDNS survey assesses the diet, nutrient intake and nutritional status of a representation sample of around 1000 people per year (500 children and 500 adults).

According to the latest National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS) by Public Health England, children aged 4 to 10 years are consuming more than double the recommended amount of sugar although consumption of sugary drinks has fallen compared to 6 years ago. The NDNS survey assesses the diet, nutrient intake and nutritional status of a representation sample of around 1000 people per year (500 children and 500 adults).

In 2012 to 2014, four to ten year olds drank 100mls on average of sugary drinks, a decrease from 130 mls/day in 2008 to 2010.  However sugar was found to makes up 13% of children’s daily calorie intake (the official recommendation is to limit sugar to no more than 5%) with teenagers consuming 3 times the official recommendation and adults over twice as much.  

The survey also found that the UK’s population is not consuming the recommendation of 5 a day for fruit and vegetables, with only eight per cent of children aged 11 to 18 years, 27% of adults (aged 19 to 64) and 35% of those aged 65 years and over, meeting these recommendations. 

Mean consumption of oily fish in all age groups still remains well below the recommended one portion (140g) per week with mean consumption the equivalent to 13–29 grams per week in children and 54–87 grams per week in adults.

Women aged 19 to 65 years and over met the recommendation of not exceeding 70g per day of red and processed meat consumption, although men aged 19 – 65 years and over exceeded the recommendation.  The survey also reports that saturated fat intake is above the recommendation of 11% of daily intake.  Average saturated fat intake for adults aged 19 to 64 is 12.7% of daily calorie intake. 

The reports states that there was also evidence of deficiencies in some micronutrients.  For vitamin D, RNIs are set only for those aged up to 4 years and those aged 65 years and over.  Mean intakes from food sources only were well below the recommendation in both these age groups: 29% of the RNI for children aged 1.5 to 3 years and 33% of the recommendation for adults aged 65 years and over.  Evidence continues to indicate low intakes for some vitamins and minerals (such as vitamin A and iron) in a proportion of participants, particularly in those aged 11 to 18 years. 

The survey also analysed blood samples taken from participants.  This data provided an assessment of the availability of nutrients to the body (after absorption) for use in metabolic processes. It reports that there is evidence of low vitamin B12 status from serum vitamin B12 in girls aged 11 to 18 years and in adults aged 19 years and over.   It also found that vitamin D concentrations were below the threshold of 25nmol/L in all age/sex groups which they state has implications for bone health, increasing the risk of rickets and osteomalacia. 

In a press release Dr Alison Tedstone, chief nutritionist at PHE state that “while it is encouraging that young children are having fewer sugary drinks, they still have far too much sugar in their diet overall, along with teenagers and adults.  To help tackle this PHE is launching a programme to challenge the food industry to remove at least 20% of the sugar in its products by 2020. It an ambitious programme, a world first and will be a significant step on the road to reducing obesity levels.”

RSSL's Product and Ingredient Innovation Team, has considerable experience in re-formulating products to provide more healthy options including low salt, low sugar versions and using pre- and probiotics.  Using RSSL can help speed up your development cycle considerably.  For more information please contact Customer Services on +44 (0) 118 918 4076 or email enquiries@rssl.com

share this article
RSSL endeavours to check the veracity of news stories cited in this free e-mail bulletin by referring to the primary source, but cannot be held responsible for inaccuracies in the articles so published. RSSL provides links to other World Wide Web sites as a convenience to users, but cannot be held responsible for the content or availability of these sites. This document may be copied and distributed provided the source is cited as RSSL's Food e-News and the information so distributed is not used for profit.

Previous editions

Load more editions

Make an Enquiry