12 January - 20 June 2016

Other headlines

  • Survey finds increased public concern over diet in Scotland
  • High protein diet may not help those with chronic kidney disease
  • World’s most expensive ingredient grown in Wales due to climate change
  • What is the impact of labelling food products as snacks or meals?
  • Brazilian fruit found to have bioactive properties
  • Five global food trends announced by Mintel
  • Obesity rise for second year in a row in reception year children
  • Frequent sugar-sweetened beverage consumption may increase risk of diabetes, high blood pressure and metabolic syndrome
  • Adding calorie information to menus may encouraged reduction of calories

Survey finds increased public concern over diet in Scotland
A Food Standards Scotland survey shows increasing public concern over diet in Scotland. The biannual ‘Food in Scotland’ Consumer Tracking Survey, reports that 65% of people in Scotland are concerned about having a healthy diet, an increase of 15% since December 2015.  The survey found that people in Scotland perceive price to be one of the biggest barriers to eating healthily with 77% concerned about food prices generally and around half of the public (47%) believe it’s too expensive to eat healthily.  Price promotion on less healthy foods was significant concern, with 7 in 10 of the population (71%) agreeing that this as an area that worries them. The survey report hat as a nation consumers are aware of the causes of obesity and the steps needed to address our unhealthy diet. Over three-quarters of the population in Scotland are also in favour of government intervention to limit how much sugar, fat or salt goes into our food.

RSSL's Product and Ingredient Innovation Team, has considerable experience in re-formulating products to provide more healthy options including low salt, low sugar versions and using pre- and probiotics.  Using RSSL can help speed up your development cycle considerably. To find out more please contact Customer Services telephone 0118 918 4076 or e-mail enquiries@rssl.com

High protein diet may not help those with chronic kidney disease
A study by researchers from the University of California, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, suggests that use of a high protein diet for those with chronic kidney disease may result in long-term kidney damage. The study estimates that chronic kidney disease affects 1 in 10 of the world’s population and looks at the management of chronic kidney disease through nutrition. As well as finding that high protein diets, often used to control weight gain and tackle obesity, may have a damaging effect, the study reports that a low protein, low salt diet can slow the progress of the chronic kidney disease and control high levels of urea and other toxins in the blood in the advanced stage of the disease. Lead researcher Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh is quoted as saying that “the high protein diet that has been used increasingly in recent years to control weight gain and obesity may have deleterious impacts on kidney health in the long term”. Kalantar-Zadeh added that “there is an exceptionally high cost and burden of maintenance dialysis therapy and kidney transplantation. Thus, dietary interventions and nutritional therapy may be increasingly chosen as a management strategy for CKD, helping to increase longevity and delaying the need for the onset of dialysis for millions of people worldwide”. (EurekAlert)

World’s most expensive ingredient grown in Wales due to climate change
Due to climate change a company has managed to cultivate a Mediterranean black truffle in Wales.  The black truffle, which is one of the world’s most expensive ingredients and is mostly found in northern Spain, Southern France and northern Italy, was grown as part of a project run by Mycorrhizal Systems Ltd and harvested in March 2017.  The project inoculated the truffle species, into the root system of a Mediterranean oak tree planted in 2008.  The earth around the tree was treated with lime to make it less acidic.  The Standard quotes Dr Paul Thomas, of MSL and the University of Stirling, as saying: "This cultivation has shown that the climatic tolerance of truffles is much broader than previously thought, but it's likely that it's only possible because of climate change, and some areas of the UK - including the area around Cambridge - are now suitable for the cultivation of this species."

What is the impact of labelling food products as snacks or meals?
University of Surrey scientists are reporting in the journal Appetite that labelling a food as a snack can lead to increased consumption.  Eight participants were asked to consume a pasta pot labelled as either a snack or meal.  If it was labelled as a meal the participants were seated at a table with a plate and metal fork, if snack the participants consumed the food out of the plastic pot and used a plastic fork.  After consumption the participants were invited to test different foods.  When the product was consumed as a snack, the participants ate more test foods than when the food was labelled as a meal.  The researchers report that when the participants consumed the snack standing up they consumed 50% more total mass, sweet mass and total calories and 100% more M&M's than those who had eaten the pasta sitting down at a table.  In a press release Jane Ogden, one of the researchers, is quoted as saying “With our lives getting busier increasing numbers of people are eating on the go and consuming foods that are labelled as 'snacks' to sustain them. What we have found is that those who are consuming snacks are more likely to over eat as they may not realise or even remember what they have eaten. To overcome this we should call our food a meal and eat it as meal, helping make us more aware of what we are eating so that we don't overeat later on."

Brazilian fruit found to have bioactive properties
Research has suggested that a little-known fruit, found in Brazil’s Atlantic Rainforest, genus Eugenia, has bioactive properties similar to those of blueberries, cranberries, blackberries and strawberries, and could offer huge potential in the food and pharmaceutical industries.  The scientists report after evaluating phenolic compounds in fruits, they found that the native Brazilian species araçá-piranga (E. leitonii), cereja-do-rio-grande (E. involucrata), grumixama (E. brasiliensis) e ubajaí (E. myrcianthes) which are  all from genus Eugenia and bacupari-mirim (Garcinia brasiliensis) are examples of functional foods, which as well as containing vitamins and nutritional values, have powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agents.  They authors report that “the action mechanism is also extremely interesting. It occurs spontaneously and right at the start of the inflammation, blocking a specific pathway in the inflammatory process. It also acts on the endothelium of blood vessels, preventing leukocytes from transmigrating to the damaged tissue and reducing exacerbation of the inflammatory process." (Science Daily)

RSSL can analyse food products for polyphenolic components. To find out more please contact Customer Services telephone 0118 918 4076 or e-mail enquiries@rssl.com

Five global food trends announced by Mintel
Mintel have announced five key trends set to impact the global food and drink market over the coming year. Full disclosure – Traceability and transparency are key. Manufacturers need to offer thorough and honest disclosures about how, where, when, and by whom food and drink is grown, harvested, made, and/or sold.  Self-fulfilling practices – Due to modern life being hectic and stressful, flexible and balanced diets will become integral elements of consumer’s self-care routines. This will reinforce the need for a variety of formats, formulations and portion sizes of food and drink that present consumers with positive solutions—and treats. Consumers will be looking for ingredients, products, and combinations of food and drink that provide nutrition, physical, or emotional benefits that advance their priorities for self-care. New sensations - Texture is the latest tool to engage the senses and deliver share-worthy experiences. The quest for experiences will provide opportunities for multisensory food and drink that uses unexpected texture to provide consumers, especially the teens and young adults of the iGeneration, with tangible connections to the real world, as well as moments worth sharing either in-person or online. Preferential treatment – Due to the expansion of online and mobile food shopping there is a new era in personalisation, making shopping as effortless as possible.  Using technology, companies and retailers can establish new levels of efficiency, such as customised recommendations, cross-category pairings, and resourceful solutions that save consumers time, effort, and energy. Science Fare - In 2018, technology will begin to disrupt the traditional food chain as enterprising manufacturers aim to replace farms and factories with laboratories.

RSSL's Product and Ingredient Innovation Team, has considerable experience in re-formulating products to provide more healthy options including low salt, low sugar versions and using pre- and probiotics.  Using RSSL can help speed up your development cycle considerably. To find out more please contact Customer Services telephone 0118 918 4076 or e-mail enquiries@rssl.com

Obesity rise for second year in a row in reception year children
Recent figure released from Public Health England’s National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP) show an obesity rise for the second year in a row in reception year children in 2016 to 2017. Figures are up from 9.3% in 2015 to 2016 to 9.6% in the 2016 to 2017 school year.  For year 6 children it has remained stable at 20%.  PHE note that is a “stubborn gap between the richest and poorest.”  They note that in deprived areas 12.7% of children in reception year are obese, compared to 5.8% in the least deprived. Obesity in year 6 is 26.3% in the most deprived areas, compared to 11.4% in the least deprived. Dr Alison Tedstone, Chief Nutritionist at PHE, said “Children deserve a healthy future and these figures are a reminder that addressing childhood obesity requires urgent action. There is no single solution to reverse what’s been decades in the making. We need sustained actions to tackle poor diets and excess calorie intakes.”

RSSL's Product and Ingredient Innovation Team, has considerable experience in re-formulating products to provide more healthy options including low salt, low sugar versions and using pre- and probiotics.  Using RSSL can help speed up your development cycle considerably. To find out more please contact Customer Services telephone 0118 918 4076 or e-mail enquiries@rssl.com

Frequent sugar-sweetened beverage consumption may increase risk of diabetes, high blood pressure and metabolic syndrome
Findings from a review published in the Journal of Endocrine Society have indicated that regularly drinking sugar-sweetened beverages can contribute to the development of diabetes, high blood pressure and metabolic syndrome.  The study reviewed 36 studies on the cardiometabolic effects of sugar-sweetened beverage consumption from the past decade. Essop et al. note that recent studies had conflicting findings so they assessed “the landscape for overall trends” noting that the majority supported a link of developing the metabolic syndrome.  Most of the studies included in the review focused on individuals who consumed over five sugar-sweetened beverages a week. However diet and diabetes studies suggest that drinking two sugar-sweetened drinks a week is linked to an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes.  Drinking at least one sugar-sweetened beverage is associated with increased blood pressure.

RSSL has a broad range of knowledge and expertise in sugar replacers and sweeteners, including natural sweeteners, and has experience in reducing sugar or calories in a variety of food categories. To find out more please contact Customer Services telephone 0118 918 4076 or e-mail enquiries@rssl.com

Adding calorie information to menus may encouraged reduction of calories
Displaying calorie information on menus encouraged a reduction of 27 calories (112 kilojoules) per meal for consumers and 15 calories (62 kilojoules) per menu item by food retailers according to a meta-analysis published in the International Journal of Retailing.  The study investigated the effect of displaying calories on menus on consumers and retailers choice. Zlatevska et al. report that for those who eat out regularly this can make a real difference in calorie reduction.  The team found that the impact is greater for women, with a 60 calorie (251 kilojoule) reduction per meal, and for those who are overweight, with a reduction of 83 calories (347 kilojoules) per meal. (Science Daily)

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