12 January - 20 June 2016

Alpha linoleic linseed oil enriched with diacylglycerol found to increase dietary fat oxidation

Scientists from Tokyo, Japan have concluded that consumption of an oil rich in alpha linoleic acid (ALA), such as linseed, enriched with diacylglycerol (DAG) may increase dietary fat oxidation compared to a regular alpha linoleic oil, and could be useful in the prevention of obesity

Scientists from Tokyo, Japan have concluded that consumption of an oil rich in alpha linoleic acid  (ALA), such as linseed, enriched with diacylglycerol (DAG) may increase dietary fat oxidation compared to a regular alpha linoleic oil, and could be useful in the prevention of obesity.  The study published in Nutrition Research reports that previous research has found that ALA enhances fatty acid oxidation and enhances thermogenesis and deceases body weight in animals.  However human studies have yet to demonstrate the same conclusions.  DAG, a natural component, has been found in animal studies to increase fatty acid oxidation in the small intestine and liver.  This resulted in “lower tissue storage levels”. 

The study, a double blind randomised cross over study by Yasutoshi et al., recruited 17 men and women aged 35-57 years with a BMI 23.0-29.6 kg/m2.  The participants were instructed to consume either 2.5g daily of ALA-DAG oil or 2.5 g daily of ALA-triacylglycerol oil (ALA-TAG) for four weeks and then switch to the other oil after a 4 week washout period. The ALA-TAG oil contained 2.8g DAG per 100g glyceride, whereas the ALA-DAG oil contained 78.1g DAG per 100g glyceride. For TAG and others, the ALA-TAG oil contains 97.2g per 100g glyceride and the ALA-DAG contained 21.3g per 100g glyceride.  Both oils were prepared with linseed oil.  At the end of each intervention period the participants were supplied with breakfast, lunch and dinner and instructed to fast for at least 12 hours.  Blood samples were collected and body weight and visceral fat measured.  The scientists assessed dietary fat oxidation by giving the participant a test meal containing 400 mg C-labelled triolein and 2.5g of test oil.  The test meal had to be ingested in less than 15 minutes.  Breath samples were collected every hour for 6 hours. “Dietary fat oxidation was assessed by measuring the recovery rate of the ingested C-labelled triolein as CO2 in the breath using a stable isotope ratio mass spectrometer.” 

Yasutoshi et al. found that “cumulated CO2 recovery rate was significantly increased by ALA-DAG consumption compared with ALA-TAG suggesting that 4 week ALA-DAG consumption increased the oxidation of dietary fat taken together with it.” They continue by stating that “in the present study we demonstrated that the postprandial dietary fat oxidation rate was approximately 2.9% greater with ALA-DAG consumption than with ALA-TAG consumption for 6 hours. If a similar difference in the postprandial fat oxidation were to persist in subsequent meals, this would correspond to ~ 3.1g/day of enhanced dietary fat oxidation induced by ALA-DAG consumption compared with ALA-TAG consumption.”   Visceral fat area or excess adipose tissue accumulation was also found to be significantly lower after 4 week ALA-DAG consumption with ALA-TAG consumption (102.9 ± 51.9 cm2 and 110.9 ± 51.7 cm2 respectively. They conclude by stating “These results indicate that ALA-DAG consumption may be useful for preventing obesity.”

RSSL's Lipids Laboratory, has expertise in all aspects of fat analysis and fatty acid profiling including the determination of CLA.  To find out more please contact Customer Services telephone 0118 918 4076 or e-mail enquiries@rssl.com

share this article
RSSL endeavours to check the veracity of news stories cited in this free e-mail bulletin by referring to the primary source, but cannot be held responsible for inaccuracies in the articles so published. RSSL provides links to other World Wide Web sites as a convenience to users, but cannot be held responsible for the content or availability of these sites. This document may be copied and distributed provided the source is cited as RSSL's Food e-News and the information so distributed is not used for profit.

Previous editions

Load more editions

Make an Enquiry