12 January - 20 June 2016

Other headlines

  • Government proposes drinks bottles and can deposit return scheme
  • PHE is seeking views on Nutrient Profiling Model
  • Forget food diaries.  A tooth mouth sensor has been designed to monitor food intake
  • Adequate meal timing and frequency has a pivotal role in glucose control and weight loss
  • Researchers develop bread that suppresses appetite
  • Demand for plant based protein is set to expand at annual growth rate of 8%
  • Diets rich in mono-unsaturated fats from plants may lower the risk of death from heart disease and other causes
  • Insect protein supplementation may not deliver muscle gain
  • Does the use of nutritional labelling reduce calorie intake?
  • Gut bacteria has big Impact on diet-related changes to blood pressure
  • Soy based formula for new borns found to have an impact on their reproductive system
  • Public Health England (PHE) unveil plans to reduce 20% of calorific content in popular foods by 2024
  • Can consumption of vitamin D help to prevent cancer?
  • Latest data on nation’s diet – PHE

Government proposes drinks bottles and can deposit return scheme 
The UK government has announced that it will be introducing a new scheme in a bid to increase recycling and cut waste.  The new deposit and return scheme will mean that shoppers will be charged a refundable extra fee when buying single-use drinks and will apply to single-use glass and plastic bottles, and steel and aluminium cans. Similar schemes are already being used in northern Europe, and have proven successful.   Ministers have already visited several European nations where the schemes are being used.  According to the BBC they were impressed with a Norwegian scheme, which claims a 94% recycling rate for bottles made from PET, the clear plastic used for water and fizzy drinks.

PHE is seeking views on Nutrient Profiling Model
PHE is consulting on an updated Nutrient Profiling Model, that differentiates which food and drink products can be advertised during children’s programming. The NPM is a tool used by the Office of Communications (Ofcom) and Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) to give food and drink products a score. This score determines whether products can be advertised during children’s television programming and non-broadcast media including print, cinema, online, and in social media. In this consultation, PHE is asking for views on the technical basis of bringing the draft revised version in line with current UK dietary recommendations. It does not cover the application of the NPM or further restrictions to advertising during children’s programming. The consultation opens closes on 15 June 2018. (quoted directly)

Forget food diaries.  A tooth mouth sensor has been designed to monitor food intake
A tooth mouth sensor may be able to be used to monitor food intake replacing food diaries which are currently used. This current method is prone to reporting errors, with people not recording intake properly.  Alternative methods have been tried such as a mouthguard-based electrochemical sensors, but these are cumbersome to use. This new 2 millimetre square sensor, designed by Tufts University School of Engineering in Medford, MA, can be attached to the tooth and is able to collect information in real time about a person’s consumption of salt, glucose, and alcohol as it enters the mouth.  It can also analyse chemicals in salvia, as well as rate stress levels and other physiological states. (Medical News Today)

Adequate meal timing and frequency has a pivotal role in glucose control and weight loss
Findings of a study presented at the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago, have suggested that a diet consisting of three meals per day may benefit patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes.  Compared to the traditional six small meals per day recommended for diabetes, the 3 meals per day, can lead to better weight loss, less hunger and better diabetes control while using less insulin. The authors suggest that time of consumption and frequently of when you eat is more important than what you eat.  The study involved 11 women and 18 men with an average age of 69 years, all who had obesity and type 2 diabetes.  The participants were split into two groups, who consumed either a traditional diet for diabetes and weight loss of 6 small meals per day, or 3 meals consisting of a large breakfast, medium sized lunch and a small dinner. Both diets contained the same number of calories. Two weeks before intervention and for the first two weeks of intervention and at the end of the study, glucose levels and glucose spikes were recorded.  The scientists found that after 3 months, the 3 meals per day group had lost 5 kg, whilst the 6 meals group had gained 1.4 kg.  Fasting glucose levels decreased more in the 3 meals per day group compared to the 6 meals group (54mg/dl vs 23 mg/dl respectively).  Whilst glucose levels after the first 14 days, dropped by 26 mg/dl in the 3 meals group, and 9 mg/dl in the 6 meals group.  After 3 months glucose levels dropped by 38 mg/dl in the 3 meals group compared to 17 mg/dl in the 6 meals group. The the 3 meals group needed less insulin compared to the 6 meals group.  (Medical Xpress)

Researchers develop bread that suppresses appetite
Researchers have developed a cereal-based bread enriched with soluble fibre, protein and 22% dried fruit, which they report can reduce food consumption between meals, alleviating hunger in healthy adult. The study by UGR researchers and published in the Journal of Nutrition recruited participants aged between 18 and 29 years old. Each volunteer consumed the cereal-based bread and the control bread (sliced white bread (85g), jam (10g) and margarine (2g)) twice, with a 1-wk wash-out period, over a total of 4 sessions.  The study examined appetite ratings and postprandial glucose, insulin, and gastrointestinal hormone responses related to hunger and satiety after the intake of the bread. Consumption of the cereal-based bread contributed to appetite control by reducing hunger and enhancing satiety. In addition, consumption of the new bread improved glycemic, insulinemic, and gastrointestinal hormone responses in healthy adults. 

RSSL's Product and Ingredient Innovation Team, has considerable experience in re-formulating products to provide more healthy options including low salt, low sugar versions and using pre- and probiotics.  Using RSSL can help speed up your development cycle considerably. To find out more please contact Customer Services telephone 0118 918 4076 or e-mail enquiries@rssl.com

Demand for plant-based protein is set to expand at annual growth rate of 8%
A new report which examines plant-based proteins, coordinated by the FAIRR Initiative, has examined the market potential of plant based proteins. It suggests that, in the next four years, the use of plant-based ingredients, used to produce sustainable, healthy foods, are set to have an annual growth rate of 8.29%.  It examines how large multinationals are positioned to capitalise on the rising demand for alternative protein, noting that companies appear to lack “a coherent strategy on how to market and promote alternative protein products on supermarket shelves to drive sales.”  Jeremy Coller, Founder of the FAIRR Initiative is quoted as saying “Today’s Plant-Based Profits report show that alternative proteins are rapidly going mainstream.  From meatpackers to supermarket stackers, the global food sector is rapidly taking notice of plant-based alternatives to animal protein products and this is driving the 8% annual growth in the alternative proteins market.”

RSSL's team of experienced product developers and food scientists can assist your with your protein food and drink development needs. To find out more please contact Customer Services telephone 0118 918 4076 or e-mail enquiries@rssl.com

Diets rich in mono-unsaturated fats from plants may lower the risk of death from heart disease and other causes
Preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association Meeting Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2018 has reported that diets rich in mono-unsaturated fats from plants may lower the risk of death from heart disease and other causes. The largest reduction in the risk of death were found when healthy fats from plant sources replaced saturated fats, trans fats and refined carbohydrates. Sources of mono-unsaturated fats include olive and other vegetable oils, avocados and many nuts and seeds. Sources of animal-based mono-unsaturated fats include full-fat dairy products, eggs, poultry, red meats and fish. The scientists came to these conclusions after they studied the link between mono-unsaturated fatty acids consumption and death from cardiovascular disease and other causes.  They used data from 63,412 women from the Nurses’ Health Study and 29,966 men from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. They found those who consumed a higher intake of mono-unsaturated fatty acids from plants had a 16% lower risk of death from any cause compared to those with lower intakes. Participants with a higher intake of mono-unsaturated fatty acids from animals had a 21% higher risk of death from any cause. Replacing saturated fats, refined carbohydrates  or trans fats with an equal number of calories (2 percent - 5 percent of the total) from mono-unsaturated fatty acids from plants might lower the risk of heart disease deaths and death from any cause between 10 % and 15%. Replacing mono-unsaturated fatty acids from animals with an equal amount of calories (5 percent of the total) of mono-unsaturated fatty acids from plants might lower the risk of heart disease deaths and deaths from any cause between 24% and 26%.

RSSL's Lipids Laboratory, part of the Investigative Analysis Team can determine the fatty acid profile of all dietary fats and oils. To find out more please contact Customer Services telephone 0118 918 4076 or e-mail enquiries@rssl.com

Insect protein supplementation may not deliver muscle gain
A study carried out by Aarhus University, published in the Nutrients Journal, found that there may be no muscle or body mass gain advantages to insect protein over carbohydrate supplementation, despite studies showing that meal worm protein has the same level of amino acids as soy protein, as well as being similarly as bioavailable and easily digested as whey protein.  Healthy male participants underwent 8 weeks of regular resistance training with supplementation of either insect protein or carbohydrate supplements as their main protein source, measuring their strength and body composition before and after.  It was found that all participants expressed significant fat and bone free mass gain, but no significant advantage from insect protein supplementation was expressed. This could however be a result of a number of factors such as the high habitual protein intake present in both groups, as well as a difference in energy balance between individuals which may have affected results. Further study is required in this area as insect protein could be a valuable source of dietary protein in the future, strongly dependent on evidence of its ability to promote physical changes, with growing population and environmental sustainability becoming a prominent topic.

Does the use of nutritional labelling reduce calorie intake?
A high calorie diet can lead to people becoming overweight and increases the risks of different health problems (heart disease, diabetes and cancers). Nutritional labelling is recommended as a way to promote healthier food purchasing and consumption behaviour. A study published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews has assessed the impact of nutritional labelling for food and non-alcoholic drinks on purchasing and consumption of healthier items.  The team analysed 28 different studies mainly carried out in the US (21 out of the 28). Eleven of the studies were “on the impact of nutritional labelling on purchasing food or drink options in real world settings”. Only one of the studies, based on labelling on restaurant menus, showed modest evidence that nutritional labelling may reduce the amount of calories purchased (by 47 calories). However the quality of the study was rated as low because of the high risks of bias. The other 17 studies were conducted in artificial scenarios. None of them provided any significant evidence that nutritional labelling helped to reduce calorie consumption. Again the quality of the studies was rated as low. Even if no significant differences were found, the researcher concluded that calorie labelling may help as part of a larger plan to reduce obesity. They also mentioned that additional high quality studies should be conducted to obtain better results.

RSSL's Product and Ingredient Innovation Team, has considerable experience in re-formulating products to provide more healthy options including low salt, low calorie, low sugar versions and using pre- and probiotics.  Using RSSL can help speed up your development cycle considerably. To find out more please contact Customer Services telephone 0118 918 4076 or e-mail enquiries@rssl.com

Gut bacteria has a big impact on diet-related changes to blood pressure
A study carried out by the University of Kent, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition,  has found that the effectiveness of a diet to lower blood pressure can be dependent on the metabolic and microbiological background of the individual, such as their gut bacteria. The study recruited 158 participants with pre-hypertension and stage 1 hypertension.  The participants consumed 3 different diets: carbohydrate-rich, protein-rich and monounsaturated fat-rich diets in a randomized, crossover study.  During each diet, urine samples were collected and analysed. The study reports that “all three diets induced a similar pattern of change in the urinary metabolic profiles for the majority of participants.” They note that “Blood pressure (BP) was found to be significantly associated with 6 urinary metabolites reflecting dietary intake.”  Although each diet was found to lower the participant’s blood pressure, gut bacteria influenced how effective the diet was. The study notes that further research is required on this area, however, it concluded by stating that dieticians and doctors should consider taking patient’s metabolic and microbiological background into account in the future when prescribing diets to treat high blood pressure and in turn help to prevent cardiovascular diseases.

Soy-based formula for new borns found to have an impact on their reproductive system
Soy-based formula can be chosen as an alternative for babies who are unable to digest cow milk properly. A study published  in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism and funded and led by the National Institute of Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health, has found that babies who consumed soy-based formula as a new born had differences in some reproductive system cells and tissues compared to babies fed cows or breast milk. Stallings et al. report that the main difference were found in female participants, whilst the feeding choice had no significant impact on males. Relative to cow-milk, formula-fed girls demonstrated tissue and organ level development trajectories consistent with response to exogenous estrogen exposure. The authors note that it is unknown whether the differences observed can have long-term consequences and suggest that a follow on study of the children who participated in this study should be done to monitor them throughout their childhood and adolescent lives.

RSSL can determine daidzein, genistein and other soya isoflavones by HPLC. To find out more please contact Customer Services telephone 0118 918 4076 or e-mail enquiries@rssl.com

Public Health England (PHE) unveil plans to reduce 20% of calorific content in popular foods by 2024
With both adult and childhood obesity on the rise, PHE are challenging the food industry to reduce calories by 20% in products by 2024. Categories of food covered by the programme include pizzas, ready meals, ready-made sandwiches, meat products and savoury snacks. Excess calorie consumption amongst children is thought to be as much as 500 calories per day, or between 2-300 calories for adults, a cause of obesity and physical disease such as cancer and Type 2 diabetes. Obesity not only causes physical health issues, but costs the NHS around £6 billion per year. The PHE paper “Calorie Reduction: The scope and ambition for action” outlines 3 ways to reduce calories; by reformulation, reducing portion size and encouraging consumers to choose lower calorie options.  The report suggests that meeting this target within 5 years, would help prevent 35,000 premature deaths and save the NHS £9bn.

RSSL's Product and Ingredient Innovation Team, has considerable experience in re-formulating products to provide more healthy options including low salt, low calorie, low sugar versions and using pre- and probiotics.  Using RSSL can help speed up your development cycle considerably. To find out more please contact Customer Services telephone 0118 918 4076 or e-mail enquiries@rssl.com

Can consumption of Vitamin D help to prevent cancer?
It has long been known that Vitamin D consumption is beneficial in the prevention of skeletal disorders, however research published in the British Medical Journal highlights the association between Vitamin D concentration and reduced risk of specific cancers within the Japanese population. Vitamin D (D2 and D3) is present in some foods such as egg yolks, liver and oily fish however a key source is the synthesis of Vitamin D3 when skin is exposed to sunlight. Using data from a large Japanese public health study of adults aged 40 to 59, the team found that plasma concentration of 2-hydroxyvitamin D to be inversely associated with the total risk of cancer, particularly true for liver cancer. Within the study, the quartile with highest levels of circulating Vitamin D had a 22% lower risk of cancer, compared to those with the lowest levels of Vitamin D. These results support previous studies suggesting that Vitamin D can have an anti-carcinogenic effect, but suggest there is an upper limit to circulatory concentrations of Vitamin D providing benefits. An optimal concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration will help to prevent cancer, however any concentration above this level will not provide further benefit.

RSSL provides vitamin analysis in a wide range of matrices including drinks, fortified foods, pre-mixes and multi-vitamin tablets, including the analysis for Vitamin D2 and Vitamin D3.  It provides a full vitamin and mineral analysis service to assist with labelling, due diligence, claim substantiation and stability. To find out more please contact Customer Services telephone 0118 918 4076 or e-mail enquiries@rssl.com

Latest data on nation’s diet – PHE
The figures from the latest National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS) collected from 2014 to 2016 show:

  • sugar makes up 13.5% of 4- to 10-year-olds, and 14.1% of teenagers’ (11- to 18-year-olds) daily calorie intake respectively; the official recommendation is to limit sugar to no more than 5%
  • 4- to 10-year-olds consume two thirds of the amount of sugary drinks they did 8 years ago – down from 130g per day in 2008 to 2010 to 83g in 2014 to 2016
  • for teenagers, sugary drink intake is more than double that of younger children (191g) even though consumption has decreased by 30%; sugary drinks remain the main source of sugar (22%) in their diets

The survey confirms the UK population continues to consume too much saturated fat and not enough fruit, vegetables, and fibre.

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