12 January - 20 June 2016

Impact of a higher protein diet with or without soy protein

A new study, published in the scientific journal Obesity Science & Practice, supported by DuPont Nutrition & Health and conducted by researchers from the Health and Wellness Center of the University of Colorado suggests that a high protein diet with or without soy protein may help cardiometabolic health and assist in maintaining weight loss.

A new study,  published in the scientific journal Obesity Science & Practice,  supported by DuPont Nutrition & Health and conducted by researchers from the Health and Wellness Center of the University of Colorado suggests that a high protein diet with or without soy protein may help cardiometabolic health and assist in maintaining weight loss.

It has been thought that high protein diet as may assist with weight loss due to increased satiety effects but previous studies have not conclusively shown any impact of the source of protein, be it plant or animal, in such a diet on weight loss.

The objective of the current study was to determine if consuming soy protein as part of a calorie- restricted and high protein diet would have an impact on weight loss, body composition and cardio metabolic health. During this one-year study, Speaker et al. asked 71 overweight or obese adults (58 females) to follow one of two diets for 4 months. One diet contained three servings of soy per day with the other containing three serving of non-soy protein foods per day. Participants were also followed up 8 months after the trial completed. At the start of the trial, after the intervention and after at follow up, participants had body weight, body fat mass, cholesterol, triglycerides and blood pressure measured to see if any weight loss had been maintained.

All participants were also following the SOS program (State of Slim). The group on the soya protein diet were given three different soy protein food products (a packet of protein powder, a protein bar and a frozen protein patty) to consume each day during the 4 months. Between 50 and 60% of their daily protein intake was based on soy protein.  For the remaining 40–50% of protein they were free to choose animal or vegetarian based protein from the SOS food lists. Participants following the non-soya diet were asked to consume three servings of self-selected soy-free protein products each day for the duration of the study.

Speaker et al.  found that both groups lost a “significant and similar” amounts of body weight during the 4-month intervention. Both groups also lost between 3 and 4% of fat mass during the first four months and there were no significant differences for the other tested parameters.  The study notes that there was also no significant difference between the groups for any of the measurements during the total 12 months of the trial and while some regained weight in the 8-month post intervention period, participants maintained an average of 4kg fat loss over the 12 months.

In conclusion, the study states that its results “provide evidence that, when consumed as part of a reduced calorie, high-protein diet, soy protein is acceptably comparable in efficacy to other proteins for weight loss among healthy, middle aged adults with overweight/obesity. These findings may be particularly useful to those looking to increase their intake of protein from high-quality, vegetarian sources as part of a high-protein, reduced calorie diet”.

RSSL's team of experienced product developers and food scientists can assist your with your protein food and drink development need. To find out more please contact Customer Services telephone 0118 918 4076 or e-mail enquiries@rssl.com

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