12 January - 20 June 2016

Ginger extract may help to prevent obesity and inflammation caused by a high fat diet

Researchers from South Korea, are reporting in the journal Nutrients that supplementing a high fat diet with ginger extract may have beneficial effects on obesity and inflammation. The study notes that functional food components such as curcumin, quercetin, resveratrol, and green tea have all been found to reduce lipid accumulation and inflammation instigated by obesity and hypertension. Ginger, has been reported to have a number of pharmacological effects including anti-obesity, anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects.

Researchers from South Korea, are reporting in the journal Nutrients that supplementing a high fat diet with ginger extract may have beneficial effects on obesity and inflammation. The study notes that functional food components such as curcumin, quercetin, resveratrol, and green tea have all been found to reduce lipid accumulation and inflammation instigated by obesity and hypertension.  Ginger, has been reported to have a number of pharmacological effects including anti-obesity, anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects.

In this current study Seunghae Kim et al. investigate the effect of high-hydrostatic pressure extract , (a method that does not destroy or denature active substances) of ginger on high fat diet induced obesity and inflammation.  The team prepared high-hydrostatic pressure extract of ginger, and hot water extracts of ginger.  The high-hydrostatic pressure extract were prepared by pulverising root ginger with distilled water. This was then poured into plastic bags and a number of enzymes were added.  It was then treated in a high pressure vessels, filter and freeze dried.  The hot water extracts of ginger were prepared by heating the ginger at 100 o C for three hours before being freeze dried.  

Seunghae Kim et al.  split twenty seven Sprague-Dawley rats into three groups and fed them either a 45% high fat diet, a high fat diet supplemented with hot water extract of ginger (8g/kg diet), or a high fat diet supplemented with high-hydrostatic pressure extract of ginger (8g/kg diet) for 10 weeks.  Twice a week body weight and food intake was measured. After intervention the team measured blood concentrations of triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase. Levels of triglycerides and total cholesterol were also measured in the liver and faeces. To understand the mechanisms involved in lipid metabolism and inflammatory response, the team measured mRNA levels and inflammatory cytokines.

They report that the high-hydrostatic ginger extract improved the lipid profiles in both the blood and liver.  It also increased faecal excretion of total lipids, triglycerides and total cholesterol. The researchers also found that the high-hydrostatic ginger extract reduced body weight at 5 week into the intervention.   Both extracts reduced markers of genes responsible for creation of fatty tissue. The mice fed the high-hydrostatic pressure extract were also found to have lower inflammation markers compared to the high fat group.

The team conclude by reiterating their findings and conclude by stating that the high-hydrostatic pressure ginger extract, “would be a useful for application as a functional food for the prevention of obesity and inflammation”.

RSSL can analyse for gingerols and shogaols in ginger raw materials using an INA (Institute for Nutraceutical Advancement) method. To find out more please contact Customer Services telephone 0118 918 4076 or e-mail enquiries@rssl.com

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