12 January - 20 June 2016

Can resveratrol protect against high-fat diet-induced obesity and oxidative stress?

Resveratrol, a non-flavonoid antioxidant, naturally found in the skin of grapes, roots of Japanese knotweed and groundnut, has been reported to have ROS scavenging properties. A study, published in the journal Pathophysiology, has evaluated the protective effects of resveratrol co-administration with high fat diet induced obesity and oxidative stress in rabbits.

The increase in obesity worldwide has been linked to an increase in consumption of diets high in fat and sugar.  Over-consumption can cause an increase in fat tissue located deep in the abdomen and around internal organs, which increases the “generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS)”.  ROS leads to the secretion of inflammatory adipokines, which results in oxidative stress. ROS can induce insulin resistance in adipose tissue.  Insulin resistance can lead to obesity, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. 

Resveratrol, a non-flavonoid antioxidant, naturally found in the skin of grapes, roots of Japanese knotweed and groundnut, has been reported to have ROS scavenging properties. A study, published in the journal Pathophysiology, has evaluated the protective effects of resveratrol co-administration with high fat diet induced obesity and oxidative stress in rabbits.  Resveratrol was prepared by mixing it with 10g/L of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC)

Jimoh et al. split 30 rabbits into six groups and fed them for 8 weeks either: Group 1 control group receiving 10 g/L CMC; Group 2 received high fat diet (standard diet containing 10% groundnut oil and 20% groundnut meal and 2% cholesterol) plus 10 g/L CMC; Group 3 received 200 mg/kg body weight of resveratrol; Group 4 received 400 mg/kg body weight of resveratrol; Group 5 received 200 mg/kg body weight of resveratrol and a high fat diet; and Group 6 received 600 mg/kg body weight of resveratrol and a high fat diet. The weight of the rabbits were taken before intervention and weekly during the 8 week experimental period.

At the end of intervention blood samples were collected, drawn from the heart of the animal and antioxidant enzymes analysed and glutathione peroxidase (whose main biological role is to protect the organism from oxidative damage), superoxide dismutase and catalase (very important enzyme in protecting the cell from oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species) measured.

Jimoh et al found that after 4 weeks of treatment the rabbits in the HFD groups showed a significant increase in body weight compared to the rabbits who were fed the HFD along with the resveratrol or resveratrol alone. At week 8, the rabbits in the HFD group continued to gain weight, whilst the body weight of the rabbits who received 400 mg/kg body of resveratrol or 200 mg/kg body weight of resveratrol, did not differ significantly from the control group. 

The study notes that when compared to the HFD groups, activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) decreased significantly in the HFD groups who also received resveratrol.  The rabbits who receive resveratrol alone, compared to that of the normal control rabbits, lost weight, which the authors suggest is “probably by up-regulation of adipokines that stimulate thermogenesis and cause browning of fat.”

The study concludes by reiterating their findings stating that “intake of HFD in rabbits, significantly increased body weight and serum antioxidant level.  Resveratrol administration decreased adverse effects of HFD intake in rabbits including increase in body weight and activities of SOD, GPX and CAT has observed. The adverse effects were probably reversed by resveratrol administration, indicating that resveratrol may have exerted its mitigating effects on the HFD-fed rabbits via an antioxidant mechanism.”

RSSL is happy to discuss with clients the analysis of phenolic components including procyanidins and resveratrol.  To find out more please contact Customer Services telephone 0118 918 4076 or e-mail enquiries@rssl.com

share this article
RSSL endeavours to check the veracity of news stories cited in this free e-mail bulletin by referring to the primary source, but cannot be held responsible for inaccuracies in the articles so published. RSSL provides links to other World Wide Web sites as a convenience to users, but cannot be held responsible for the content or availability of these sites. This document may be copied and distributed provided the source is cited as RSSL's Food e-News and the information so distributed is not used for profit.

Previous editions

Load more editions

Make an Enquiry